In the Galleries

26 and 28 April: Jeremy Novy Workshop and Show (Minn, MN)

JEREMY NOVY Presents: Queer Street Art, Fighting for Legitimacy

Attention MPLS art lovers! The illustrious and fabulous street artist Jeremy Novy will be gracing our fair city with his talent this month! Jeremy has spent the better part of 2 decades painting San Francisco streets, heavily involved in queer art and stenciling sidewalks and pavement with his iconic koi fish, and work boot prints that depict a kiss between two men.

This 2 night event will coincide with his stencil workshop, please contact Amalgamated for more details on doing stencils with Mr. Novy!
($60 workshop)

26 and 28 APRIL

Wednesday, April 26 at 7 PM
MPLS Make & Take Stencil Workshop with
Jeremy Novy

Friday, April 28 at 7 PM
Jeremy Novy Presents:
Queer Street Art, Fighting for Legitimacy

Location
Amalgamated MPLS
720 CENTRAL AVE NE
MINNEAPOLIS 55413

15 April: Adam Feibelman's Personal Provenance (SF, CA)

As artist Adam Feibelman found on a recent trip to walk the rugged trails traversing the border between Tucson and Nogales, the sharp divisions ingrained in national identities and our senses of place are rendered hazily ambiguous as the paths between nations wind off into the distance—no hard line in sight.  In a similar sense, the work of Taravat Talepasand capitalizes on the image systems that indoctrinate Iranian identity, state power and gender, and how these notions are portrayed within and augmented through a steady stream of American popular culture.  Through their respective exhibitions, Adam Feibelman’s Personal Provenance and Taravat Talepasand’s Born in Iran, Made in America, the artists explore the critical boundaries and borders that separate places and people—questioning, transgressing and meditating on both the systems of separation as well as a seemingly growing need for intensifying said divisions.

More Info: Guerrero Gallery

3 Mar: Jef Aerosol's People and Things (FR)

« people and things » : des gens et des choses…
Jef aurait aussi bien pu appeler cette exposition « Sujets et Objets », dans tous les sens des deux vocables.
Humains ou inertes, vivants ou inanimés, ces objets/sujets se jouxtent, se complètent, dialoguent, racontent ce que nous sommes et ce qui nous constitue : rêves, peurs, espoirs, colères, larmes, sourires, souvenirs, interrogations…

Tantôt profond ou sombre, tantôt léger ou futile, à la fois possédé par ses nostalgies et remué par l’actualité, l'artiste pulvérise ses émotions à travers la dentelle de ses pochoirs. Pour cette exposition, il a privilégié le carton et le bois de récupération : supports vivants et si « riches de leur pauvreté ». Une fois de plus, Jef Aérosol affirme cet « engagement poétique » qui le caractérise.

Né à Nantes en 1957, vivant à Lille depuis 1984, Jef Aérosol est l’un des pionniers de ce qu’on appelle aujourd’hui « street art » ou « art urbain ».
Il pose sa première empreinte au pochoir en 1982 dans la ville de Tours où il réside alors.
Son imagerie doit autant à la culture punk-rock-pop qu’aux anonymes de la rue et ses oeuvres sont toujours soulignées de sa marque de fabrique : une mystérieuse flèche rouge. Depuis, ce dandy de la bombe aérosol a laissé sa marque sur les murs de nombreuses villes dans le monde entier : pochoirs furtifs ou grandes fresques murales telle celle que la Mairie du 4ème arrondissement de Paris lui a commandée en 2011 : le grand « Chuuuttt!!! » qui trône près du Centre Pompidou, face à la fontaine de Tinguely et Nikki de St Phalle.
Ses personnages en noir, blanc et nuances de gris, illustres ou inconnus, souvent peints à l’échelle 1, témoignent de l’attachement de Jef à de profondes valeurs humanistes. Son travail est également visible dans de nombreuses manifestations et expositions en galeries et musées, tant en France qu’à l’étranger. Sur le territoire hexagonal, il est représenté à Marseille par David Pluskwa et à Paris par la prestigieuse galerie Laurent Strouk.

 

25 Feb.: Douglas Miles at the de Young (SF)

Douglas Miles, Global Fellow and February 2017 Artist-in-Residence
Kimball Education Gallery

February 1-26, 2017
Wednesdays–Sundays, 1–5 pm
Reception: Saturday February 25, 3–5 pm

APACHELYPSE Now is a glimpse into the multi-faceted work of Douglas Miles from the San Carlos Apache Nation in Arizona. Using street art forms, he creates work that simultaneously deconstructs stereotypes and emboldens Native people in the 21st century. His renegade ethos at work creates a new iconography in art, photos, and film. The title APACHELYPSE Now is an homage to Francis Ford Coppola's Vietnam epic Apocalypse Now about a lone poet, renegade colonel, and his tribe gone rogue from the U.S.

Douglas Miles is an artist, designer, photographer, filmmaker, muralist, public speaker, and founder of Apache Skateboards. His work encourages reflection on how art can foster community-building and promote pride and well-being, especially among young people. His work is rooted in Apache history and deeply engaged with the world of contemporary pop culture. Miles’ work has been exhibited at Princeton University, Columbia University, the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History, and the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum in Santa Fe. He recently collaborated with actor and author Ethan Hawke and artist Greg Ruth on a New York Times bestseller graphic novel, Indeh: A Story of the Apache Wars.

Ticket Information
The Kimball Education Gallery is located in the free zone of the museum; no tickets are required. Please drop by any time during open hours.

Ancient Stencils Reproduced for Cave Temples of Dunhuang Exhibit

Reproduction allows for the widespread sharing of treasures without endangering them.
By LEE LAWRENCE for the WSJ
July 5, 2016 5:18 p.m. ET
7 COMMENTS
Los Angeles

Cave Temples of Dunhuang: Buddhist Art on China’s Silk Road
The Getty
Through Sept. 4

On a sunny afternoon, the glare in the Getty Center’s Arrival Plaza is blinding—and stepping into Cave 285 feels like teleporting to heaven. Here, in one of the main features of “Cave Temples of Dunhuang: Buddhist Art on China’s Silk Road,” winged creatures flutter on the vaulted ceiling while, on the walls, Buddhas preach, myths unfold, mortals repent, donors pay homage. Amid scrolling florals and colored flames, a large Buddha sits, his face a featureless mass of clay. This is a full-size copy, created by hand on the basis of detailed scans and myriad photographs of a grotto carved into cliffs that edge the Gobi desert in northwestern China. It is as faithful to the colors, designs and brushstrokes artists used in A.D. 538-39 as it is to the deterioration and damage that nature and man have since wrought.

The fragility of some sites has made copies an increasingly viable way to share treasures more widely without endangering them. The Getty’s exhibition uses them in tandem with more traditional displays to bring out the richness, complexity and conservation challenges of one of the world’s great art treasures. Its curatorial team includes experts from the Getty’s institutes for research and conservation, the Dunhuang Academy and the New York-based Dunhuang Foundation, and while theirs is not the first U.S. show to tackle the subject, it is the most ambitious.

The Handcrafted Paper Stencils of a Kimono Designer Who Turned to Prints

The Handcrafted Paper Stencils of a Kimono Designer Who Turned to Prints
by Claire Voon on February 24, 2016 for Hyperallergic

For decades, the late Japanese artist Yoshitoshi Mori worked as an established kimono designer, using a stencil-based technique to dye his textiles. When he shifted his focus entirely to printmaking in 1960 after experimenting with the medium, he continued working with this layered design method. His resulting wealth of kappazuri — works produced with carefully hand-cut paper stencils — drew from the mingei folk art movement of the ’20s and ’30s that cherished handicraft. Looking further back into Japanese visual traditions, they also focus on subjects of pleasure widely depicted in the ukiyo-e of the Edo period, showing sensual courtesans, kabuki actors, and scenes from Japanese myth. Multilayered and composed of intricate shapes, Mori’s prints are best appreciated up close, an opportunity given by a current exhibition at Ronin Gallery that also features a handful of his sketchbook illustrations and paintings.

While stencil-based printmaking may conjure images with rigid forms, Mori’s prints are incredibly dynamic, composed of thick but fluid lines that constantly move the eye. One rendering of Taira no Tomomori, a warrior figure and popular character included in kabuki plays, juxtaposes swirling patterns on the man’s garments with dramatic hair that shoots from his head like a fountain. In another print, the voluptuous curves of a woman taking an afternoon nap seem to make her teeter on her back. Although his works do not necessarily involve movement, with many of them being portraits, his playing of negative and positive space introduces a delightful animation.

19 Feb: Swoon and Monica Canilao: Witch-Wife (SF, CA)

Witch-Wife will open at Chandran Gallery (459 Geary St., San Francisco) on Friday, February 19 from 7–9:30 p.m. and will run through April 1. ChandranGallery.com

The show will feature new works in both painting, block-prints, wheatpaste, sculpture, installation, and murals. For Brooklyn-based artist Swoon, this is the first time in a few years we have seen her in a gallery setting with this much new work. From our small preview last week, the installtion and sculptures are some of the duo's most ambitious works to date.

East Bay Express Preview, with interviews of artists, is here.

Jan 29: Synergy: Jef Aerosol, Lee Jeffries (London)

JEF AEROSOL & LEE JEFFRIES

"SYNERGY"

29/01 > 25/02/2016

opening / vernissage : 28/01/2016 (18h > 21h)

THE FRENCH ART STUDIO GALLERY, LONDON

Synergy – When photography and stencil interact

[synergy: interaction of elements to produce a combined effect greater than the sum of their separate effects]

‘Synergy’ is an artistic and social encounter between French street artist Jef Aérosol and British photographer Lee Jeffries.

Stemming from the original ‘Synergy’ exhibition that took place in Paris at Mathgoth gallery in March 2015, this collaboration casts a new light on a sensitive topic: the homeless.

Theorem Art in Williamsburg, VA

Colonial Williamsburg presents theorem art at Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum
By HOLLY PRESTIDGE Richmond Times-Dispatch | Posted: Saturday, December 5, 2015 10:30 pm

“Theorem work,” a popular method of watercolor stencil painting on fabric, wood and paper, was used to decorate everyday objects and create decorative pictures in the 19th century.


An exhibit highlighting the artwork, which was popular as a skill for women, is on display in Colonial Williamsburg.


“Folk art enthusiasts have long associated the art of stencil with 19th-century collections, and we’re excited to share this important and vibrant form of American art with the public,” Laura Pass Barry, Colonial Williamsburg’s Juli Grainger curator of paintings, drawings and sculpture and manager for curatorial outreach, said in a release. “This exhibit will not only depict a variety of theorem compositions and subjects, but it will also show the period process which artists, schoolgirls, and everyday men and women followed to create these colorful creations making them today one of the country’s most recognized and celebrated folk art traditions.”

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