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Thanks so much - Russell

Justin Giarla flees SF, but not lawsuit

This story, where a gallery owner allegedly doesn't pay artists, is a good addition to the Stencil Archive legal feed. Before I saw this Vandalog post (with links to statements made) pop up on my social media streams, I overheard a reporter ask Shepard Fairey about it while I was watching his mural go up in Hayes Valley. Fairey replied, on the record, that he had heard about Justin Giarla's plight. "He owes me money too, but I don't really need it," Fairey said. "What makes me sad is all the money he owes to the artists that really need it." A few days later, a link showed up with more of the story, including past and future litigation over money owed to artists from Giarla's various galleries. Moral of the story: ARTIST BEWARE!

Justin Giarla closes galleries, moves to Portland, allegedly screws over his artists
by RJ Rushmore for Vandalog

There was a time not to long ago when Justin Giarla loomed large over the street art/graffiti/low-brow/Juxtapoz-friendly art scene in San Fransisco. He owned three galleries simultaneously: White Walls Gallery, Shooting Gallery, and 941 Geary. All three closed quietly earlier this year, with their final shows opening in February. The building was sold. Last month, Giarla and his girlfriend Helen Bayly packed up their things, apparently abandoned his truck on the side of the road, and skipped town for Portland. That’s when the truth finally became public: Giarla hadn’t been paying his artists.

More Fresh Photos for the Stencil Archive

<< Know this artist? Please let us know their name.

>NEW< E! (Berlin)
>NEW< Evol (Tiny Cities)
>NEW< KUSEK (Berlin)
>NEW< Lembo (Berlin)
>NEW< Long Legs (Berlin)… Anyone know this artist’s name? Long Legs is temporary until someone figures this out! - R

Robi the Dog (just one)
ROLF (just one)
SOBR
XOOOOX (just one)

Meanwhile, in North America...

Shepard Fairey
(just one, with a cut out)
Oakland
, CA (just one)
Mexico (DF; just one; gracias, Chris)
Ohio (just one, for the Donald)
And one for Hillary In Media

1994 Scott Williams Interview (SF)

The folks at FoundSF/Shaping SF have been scanning neighborhood newspapers here in San Francisco and putting them online at Archive.org. Lisaruth from Shaping SF was nice enough to pass along this 1994 issue of the New Mission News, which included a great article about Scott Williams and his public/exhibited stencil art. Go here for the full article.

An excerpt: Williams's work has a "distinctiveness to it not found in any other work of its kind. It lies in a wildly imaginative juxtaposition of disparate images and traditions that you'd never expect to see in the same space."

SF Stencil Pics: New Uploads

Photo submission thanks to: Larry Jones
Tunes: Vinyl on Danny G.’s turntable, spinning Zappa, Bowie, and XTC

Eclair

fnnch

Clarion Alley

Haight and Divisadero Streets

Other SF Locales

Protest (just one)

Sunset District (just one)

The Castro (just one)

The Mission

Valencia St.

Western Addition (just one)

Ancient Stencils Reproduced for Cave Temples of Dunhuang Exhibit

Reproduction allows for the widespread sharing of treasures without endangering them.
By LEE LAWRENCE for the WSJ
July 5, 2016 5:18 p.m. ET
7 COMMENTS
Los Angeles

Cave Temples of Dunhuang: Buddhist Art on China’s Silk Road
The Getty
Through Sept. 4

On a sunny afternoon, the glare in the Getty Center’s Arrival Plaza is blinding—and stepping into Cave 285 feels like teleporting to heaven. Here, in one of the main features of “Cave Temples of Dunhuang: Buddhist Art on China’s Silk Road,” winged creatures flutter on the vaulted ceiling while, on the walls, Buddhas preach, myths unfold, mortals repent, donors pay homage. Amid scrolling florals and colored flames, a large Buddha sits, his face a featureless mass of clay. This is a full-size copy, created by hand on the basis of detailed scans and myriad photographs of a grotto carved into cliffs that edge the Gobi desert in northwestern China. It is as faithful to the colors, designs and brushstrokes artists used in A.D. 538-39 as it is to the deterioration and damage that nature and man have since wrought.

The fragility of some sites has made copies an increasingly viable way to share treasures more widely without endangering them. The Getty’s exhibition uses them in tandem with more traditional displays to bring out the richness, complexity and conservation challenges of one of the world’s great art treasures. Its curatorial team includes experts from the Getty’s institutes for research and conservation, the Dunhuang Academy and the New York-based Dunhuang Foundation, and while theirs is not the first U.S. show to tackle the subject, it is the most ambitious.

Deep Cuts: Stencil Videos Updated

This video from 2011 was fun to watch again. Animated cut-out street art in Turkey!

A few weeks ago, Stencil Archive got secure via Let's Encrypt! and the mad minds at Mission Web Works. This means that the site is now https, with a padlock beside the website name in your browser. Going secure, we had to begin to update all our links, which don't like embedded files from non-secure http sites.

We focused on videos the past few days and they're all updated and ready for some deep watching. Our video links go all the way back to 2007, when Flash ruled and resolution was a bit lower. And there wasn't much content protected by https.

We've gone all the way back to the first video post and attempted to fix all the links. Where video links were broken, replacement videos were posted, other sources of the video were found, or the whole post was deleted. So poke around and you may find some new stencil goodness.

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