News Articles

If You Take Street Art Off the Street, Is It Still Art?

If You Take Street Art Off the Street, Is It Still Art?

Fans Cut Mural Linked to Banksy From Wall; One Man's Rescue, Another's Heist

 WSJ link

DETROIT—Secured inside a wooden crate and locked in a warehouse is a painting that could cement this city's reputation as a showcase for avant-garde art. Or as a wasteland waiting to be picked apart.

It's a stenciled image on a 7-foot-by-7-foot slab of cinder-block wall, showing a small boy holding a can and paintbrush.

Next to the boy are the words: "I remember when all this was trees."

The painting came from the grounds of the old Packard auto plant, one of the city's infamous industrial ruins. And it is believed to be the work of the mysterious street artist Banksy, whose graffiti-like renderings adorn the lanes of London and the walls of the West Bank. His ironic urban images, or "tags," have produced world-wide fame and led him to create an Oscar-nominated documentary.

The Art of the Buff in San Francisco

The art of clearing taggers' work in San Francisco

Monday, February 21, 2011

Nobody knows more about graffiti than Joe Padilla. The paint-shop supervisor for the San Francisco Recreation and Park Department, Padilla oversees graffiti removal for all of the city's 220 parks.

A San Francisco native, Padilla, 50, was baptized at Mission Dolores and grew up at 15th and Noe streets. He lives in Richmond with his wife of 24 years, Silvana, and has three children and three granddaughters.

This shop spends $280,000 a year on graffiti abatement alone. People tag retaining walls, benches, sidewalks, pathways, curbs, signs, light poles, picnic tables, pump houses, irrigation boxes. Trees get tagged. Yes, we faux-finish a lot of trees.

We're damn good at graffiti removal. Mayor Newsom made an executive order about four, five years ago, saying all departments must deal with graffiti within 48 hours of it being reported. I have eight guys on my crew, and we average about 80 percent for removing graffiti within two days.

BrooklynStreetArt Interviews Swoon

Jaime Rojo & Steven Harrington

Posted: January 17, 2011 08:01 PM

A visit to Street Artist Swoon's studio is a full immersion into her passions; meditations on humanity, the process of collaboration, and sculptures you can inhabit.

2011-01-11-brooklynstreetartswoonjaimerojo1210web6500.jpg
Swoon adding color to the busy streets of "Cairo" (Sunday Afternoon) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In the rustic warm light of a triple height cavernous space that might have served as a town hall a score of printed artworks on paper lay scattered across the wooden floor. Tiptoeing between the images to cross the formerly grand chamber, the familiar faces of children and adults who you've met on walls across the city look up at you. Together these figures, a de facto retrospective of Swoons' last few years on the street in NYC, are burned into the retina of many a Street Art fan, and yet they lay here on this whitewashed wood-slatted floor without any ceremony at all.

SF Artist Jeremy Novy thrives

S.F. artist Jeremy Novy thrives in outdoor gallery

Saturday, November 13, 2010

Jeremy Novy is walking South of Market, deciphering his own hieroglyphics.

"That's two men kissing," he said, pointing to a stencil of two sets of boots facing each other on the sidewalk.

On the side of an abandoned ice machine business, a life-size, shirtless man in a cowboy hat leans seductively. "That's an iconic gay image," Novy said. "Like a two-step guy. Or a Marlboro man."

Scribbling in a language of doodles, stencils and graffiti, Novy uses underground street art to honor San Francisco's gay history. Much as Keith Haring's anonymous chalk drawings in the New York subways drew attention to gay culture in the 1980s, Novy is emerging as San Francisco's street whisperer.

Stencils in the Underbelly of NYC

Street Art Way Below the Street
By JASPER REES (NY Times)

A vast new exhibition space opened in New York City this summer, with a show 18 months in the making. On view are works by 103 street artists from around the world, mostly big murals painted directly onto the gallery’s walls.

It is one of the largest shows of such pieces ever mounted in one place, and many of the contributors are significant figures in both the street-art world and the commercial trade that now revolves around it. Its debut might have been expected to draw critics, art dealers and auction-house representatives, not to mention hordes of young fans. But none of them were invited.

In the weeks since, almost no one has seen the show. The gallery, whose existence has been a closely guarded secret, closed on the same night it opened.

Online: 100 pages of Trespass: A History of Uncommissioned Urban Art

http://www.taschen.com/lookinside/05719/index.htm

Taschen has posted a page-flipping version of their book "Trespass"

You can zoom in to read some pages to see the written bits.

Always happy to have the history or public art further investigated, please enjoy the text as well as the photos :)

10 Oct :: Polski Street Art Book Release (Warsaw)

Saturday at 9:00pm - October 10 at 1:30am
Centralny Basen Artystyczny
ul. Marii Konopnickiej 6 (za hotelem Sheraton)
Warszawa, Poland

 

Długo oczekiwany album POLSKI STREET ART w końcu gotowy!
Z tej okazji zapraszamy wszystkich na imprezę premierową. Na pięciu wielkoformatowych ekranach pokażemy mnóstwo street artu, do tego świetna muzyka, dobrze zaopatrzone bary i długa, październikowa noc. Wstęp wolny!

ILOŚĆ MIEJSC W KLUBIE OGRANICZONA.

Więcej o albumie:
www.polskistreetart.blogspot.com

Wsparcie promocyjne: Pompon.net, Citydoping

Zobacz film z naszej poprzedniej imprezy:
http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000522784393&v=app_2392950137#!/video/video.php?v=148458381848254

Artists Embellish Walls With Political Visions

Artists Embellish Walls With Political Visions

Original NYTimes article, with photos, found here



CARACAS, Venezuela — Of all the murals and graffiti that adorn this anarchic city’s trash-strewn center, one creation by the street artist
Carlos Zerpa fills him with special pride: a stenciled reinterpretation of Caravaggio’s “David with the Head of Goliath,” in which a warrior grasps the severed head of Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Mr. Zerpa, 26, a slightly built painter sporting a few days of stubble, shrugged at the possibility that American visitors to Caracas — or Mrs. Clinton for that matter — might find the mural offensive. “It’s a metaphor for an empire that is being defeated,” he said nonchalantly in an interview. “My critics can take it or leave it, but I remain loyal to my ideas.”

Peat Wollaeger has his eye on St. Louis

Peat Wollaeger has his eye on St. Louis
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Peat Wollaeger won't be the first to spray paint the gutted Powell Square building downtown. But he's the first to get permission.

Wollaeger plans to paint a gigantic 16-foot-by-16-foot mural on the warehouse Sunday. His message: I ♥ St. Louis. Only instead of the letter I, Wollaeger will stencil his trademark eye.

"I'm tired of the haters who say they can't wait to leave St. Louis," Wollaeger said. "Yeah, there are a lot of racist people in this town. There are a lot of people who are so closed-minded and people who only will come downtown for Cardinals games. But there are also people who put a lot of heart and soul in this town to make it a better place."

Located near Interstate 55 and the Poplar Street Bridge, the Powell Square building is a playground for vandals, a shelter for the homeless and a blemish scarring the St. Louis skyline. Chavvis Development hopes to open an arts center on the site, though director Gelinda Connell concedes the project is stalled.

"Everyone knows this building has been a magnet for vandalism and graffiti, so to replace the signatures of taggers with something really positive seemed like a great idea," said Connell, who secured owner Steven C. Murphy's permission for Wollaeger. "Peat couldn't be a better cheerleader for St. Louis, and he really commands a lot of respect among street artists."

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - News Articles