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Richmond, CA PD Install Covert Cameras

Somebody’s Watching You: City Installs Covert Cameras
by Melissa Scott Sinclair

Original SFWeekly Post

Flash. Click. Busted.

Richmond police have placed 11 hidden cameras around the city as part of a secret surveillance program intended to catch graffiti taggers, illegal dumpers and other miscreants.

How do you graffiti-proof public art?

4 July 2011 Last updated at 10:55 ET
From the BBC

Who, What, Why: How do you graffiti-proof public art?

Spray can Graffiti may be art to some, but it is seen as a nuisance by others
Continue reading the main story

A landmark sculpture project is at risk because of spiralling costs - including the budget for keeping it graffiti-free. How do you protect public artworks from vandals?

It was meant to be a towering monument - a 50m (164ft) white horse in the fields of Kent greeting Eurostar passengers to England. But now sculptor Mark Wallinger's so-called "Angel of the South" project is at risk because of rising costs.

The price tag for the Ebbsfleet Landmark Project (ELP) has gone up from £2m to £12m, according to reports, with the budget for removing graffiti over 80 years part of the revised bill.

City Buffs Legal Mural - Toronto

Artist says city erased mural it paid him to paint

June 01, 2011

David Rider

Original Article

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Mural artist Joel Richardson was paid $2,000 by the city to do a mural on a city-owned wall on Dupont just west of Lansdowne. On Tuesday, somebody -- apparently the city -- painted over it, likely as part of Rob Ford's graffiti eradication campaign.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

 

Artist Joel Richardson says the city has painted over a popular Dupont St. mural that it paid him $2,000 to create, an apparent misfire in Mayor Rob Ford’s war on graffiti.

Hong Kong Graffiti Challenges Chinese Artist's Arrest

Hong Kong Graffiti Challenges Chinese Artist's Arrest

by Louisa Lim

May 4, 2011 (from NPR)

Hong Kong police are investigating criminal damage charges against artist Tangerine for graffiti of detained Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, which could carry a maximum sentence of 10 years in jail.
Tangerine

Hong Kong police are investigating criminal damage charges against artist Tangerine for graffiti of detained Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, which could carry a maximum sentence of 10 years in jail.

Given his real-life circumstances — summarily disappeared at the hands of the Chinese authorities with no charges yet laid — the furrowed forehead and hooded, tired eyes of the image now seem a representation of suffering. Underneath his face is one simple question, "Who's afraid of Ai Weiwei?"

This graffiti, appearing all over Hong Kong, has become a political statement, more than a month after the world-famous artist was detained by the authorities at Beijing airport. The campaign could yet lead to a jail term for the young graffiti artist responsible. And that fact has led to fears about the erosion of Hong Kong's distinct freedoms, which are a legacy of its colonial past under the British.

The Art of the Buff in San Francisco

The art of clearing taggers' work in San Francisco

Monday, February 21, 2011

Nobody knows more about graffiti than Joe Padilla. The paint-shop supervisor for the San Francisco Recreation and Park Department, Padilla oversees graffiti removal for all of the city's 220 parks.

A San Francisco native, Padilla, 50, was baptized at Mission Dolores and grew up at 15th and Noe streets. He lives in Richmond with his wife of 24 years, Silvana, and has three children and three granddaughters.

This shop spends $280,000 a year on graffiti abatement alone. People tag retaining walls, benches, sidewalks, pathways, curbs, signs, light poles, picnic tables, pump houses, irrigation boxes. Trees get tagged. Yes, we faux-finish a lot of trees.

We're damn good at graffiti removal. Mayor Newsom made an executive order about four, five years ago, saying all departments must deal with graffiti within 48 hours of it being reported. I have eight guys on my crew, and we average about 80 percent for removing graffiti within two days.

Spray Paint and the Buff: Bad for Air Quality?

Paint it green

Do graffiti artists express themselves at the expense of our air quality?

by AMY KINGSLEY : AKINGSLEY@LVCITYLIFE.COM


PHOTO: BILL HUGHES

Graffiti artists and taggers already have to worry about local law enforcement catching them with a backpack full of spray paint. Someday, they may also have to dodge environmentalists and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Research by a local air quality specialist suggests graffiti -- and the efforts to cover it up -- might damage the air more than some industries that are monitored by the federal government. The turf war between graffiti artists and local officials in Clark County produced an estimated 31 tons of emissions in 2008, according to Algirdas Leskys, a senior air quality specialist with Clark County, who did the research on his own time. Paint produces volatile organic compounds, which are the precursors of the ozone that turns the air yellow and thick. The majority of the fumes came not from the graffiti itself but from the paint used to cover it up, he said.

Citizen Caught While Stenciling to "Cheer People Up"

The hearts of the matter: Brandon Hughes’ art puts him in court

photo

Brandon Hughes stenciled 12 pink hearts on Wenatchee public property last year in an attempt to “fill the city with love.” He later scrubbed away his handiwork, but still faced a malicious mischief charge in Chelan County District Court.

Brandon R. Hughes wanted to give Wenatchee a gift of sorts, and he wanted to go unnamed.

Instead, the soft-spoken, off-the-grid 28-year-old got arrested for his trouble, and became the most visible creator of a graffiti style that’s coming to the fore in NCW.

In September 2008, Hughes’ 12 stencil-painted hearts, pink and sometimes accessorized with a scribbled motto “CHOOSE LOVE,” beckoned from lightpoles, signal boxes and mailboxes around downtown. When a bystander spotted Hughes spray-painting a pink heart on a pole near midnight on Sept. 18, police were called, and suddenly Hughes had some explaining to do.

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