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Oakland Might Get Tough on Graffiti

Going After Graffiti

A new law proposed by Oakland's city attorney would impose fines on both taggers and property owners.
By J. Douglas Allen-Taylor

from the East Bay Express: http://www.eastbayexpress.com/ebx/going-after-graffiti/Content?oid=3396059

With graffiti becoming an increasingly serious problem in large areas of Oakland, the Oakland City Attorney's Office is proposing a new city ordinance that would impose financial penalties on persons convicted of applying graffiti to property within the city and on property owners who fail to remove graffiti in a timely manner. The proposal is scheduled to receive its first hearing before the city council's Public Works Committee on November 27.

If passed as proposed, the new ordinance would also impose fines on parents of minors convicted of graffiti offenses, as well as upgrade tagging from an infraction to a misdemeanor, making it a jailable offense under city law. Oakland currently has an anti-graffiti ordinance, but it is largely confined to measures to prevent youth from having access to graffiti-creating materials such as aerosol paint products.

Mayor: We’ll Arrest and Prosecute Park Vandals

Mayor: We’ll Arrest and Prosecute Park Vandals

By: Rigoberto Hernandez | June 19, 2012 – 3:24 pm (link to posting)

The vandals of Dolores Park and Potrero Del Sol have gained a new powerful enemy: Mayor Ed Lee.

Today, during the mayor’s question time at the Board of Supervisors meeting, Lee promised to take steps to curb the vandalism that has hit city parks recently.

The Helen Diller playground at Dolores Park, for example, was vandalized just days after opening in April. Vandals marked the playground with graffiti and removed six of the 14 metal keys from the xylophone, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

“Crimes of vandalism and graffiti are an assault on our public resources,” Lee said. “It’s shameful.”

Here is how the mayor promised to curb the vandalism:

  • The Parks and Recreation Department is working with food vendors and bicycle rental companies to offer “happy park uses.”
  • The San Francisco Police Department will hire nine park patrol officers (citywide.)
  • The police chief will tell his officers to enforce property crimes.
  • “Once arrested, [the DA] will work to prosecute these criminals to the full extent of the law,” Lee said.
  • Work with judges who dismiss vandalism cases and educate them on the importance of prosecution. “I see far too many [cases] dismissed,” he said.
  • A graffiti specialist is currently developing leads to apprehend the vandals.
  • Citizens are also encouraged to participate in the city’s graffiti reward program.

Vandal Stencils Original Picasso (Video, TX, USA)

Police are investigating after a vandal defaced an original Pablo Picasso painting at a Texas museum last week and it happened to be captured on video by another museum-goer.

A grainy cellphone video on YouTube shows a man in a suit spray-painting a stencil of a bullfighter killing a bull on the 1929 Picasso painting "Woman in a Red Armchair" at Houston's Menil Collection museum. The man also wrote the Spanish word "Conquista" (meaning to conquer) before he fled.

NYC Tagger Neo was also NYPD

Graffiti legend was also an NYPD cop

By KATHIANNE BONIELLO

Last Updated: 11:24 AM, November 6, 2011

Posted: 9:34 PM, November 5, 2011

Police have discovered the identity of one of New York City’s most prolific graffiti vandals -- and he’s one of their own.

Steven Weinberg, 43, of Flushing, a patrolman who retired from the NYPD in 2001 after hurting his leg, is the notorious “Neo” -- one of the peskiest subway taggers of the 1980s.

And the spray-painting miscreant is making a comeback, cops say.

Richmond, CA PD Install Covert Cameras

Somebody’s Watching You: City Installs Covert Cameras
by Melissa Scott Sinclair

Original SFWeekly Post

Flash. Click. Busted.

Richmond police have placed 11 hidden cameras around the city as part of a secret surveillance program intended to catch graffiti taggers, illegal dumpers and other miscreants.

How do you graffiti-proof public art?

4 July 2011 Last updated at 10:55 ET
From the BBC

Who, What, Why: How do you graffiti-proof public art?

Spray can Graffiti may be art to some, but it is seen as a nuisance by others
Continue reading the main story

A landmark sculpture project is at risk because of spiralling costs - including the budget for keeping it graffiti-free. How do you protect public artworks from vandals?

It was meant to be a towering monument - a 50m (164ft) white horse in the fields of Kent greeting Eurostar passengers to England. But now sculptor Mark Wallinger's so-called "Angel of the South" project is at risk because of rising costs.

The price tag for the Ebbsfleet Landmark Project (ELP) has gone up from £2m to £12m, according to reports, with the budget for removing graffiti over 80 years part of the revised bill.

City Buffs Legal Mural - Toronto

Artist says city erased mural it paid him to paint

June 01, 2011

David Rider

Original Article

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Mural artist Joel Richardson was paid $2,000 by the city to do a mural on a city-owned wall on Dupont just west of Lansdowne. On Tuesday, somebody -- apparently the city -- painted over it, likely as part of Rob Ford's graffiti eradication campaign.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

 

Artist Joel Richardson says the city has painted over a popular Dupont St. mural that it paid him $2,000 to create, an apparent misfire in Mayor Rob Ford’s war on graffiti.

Hong Kong Graffiti Challenges Chinese Artist's Arrest

Hong Kong Graffiti Challenges Chinese Artist's Arrest

by Louisa Lim

May 4, 2011 (from NPR)

Hong Kong police are investigating criminal damage charges against artist Tangerine for graffiti of detained Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, which could carry a maximum sentence of 10 years in jail.
Tangerine

Hong Kong police are investigating criminal damage charges against artist Tangerine for graffiti of detained Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, which could carry a maximum sentence of 10 years in jail.

Given his real-life circumstances — summarily disappeared at the hands of the Chinese authorities with no charges yet laid — the furrowed forehead and hooded, tired eyes of the image now seem a representation of suffering. Underneath his face is one simple question, "Who's afraid of Ai Weiwei?"

This graffiti, appearing all over Hong Kong, has become a political statement, more than a month after the world-famous artist was detained by the authorities at Beijing airport. The campaign could yet lead to a jail term for the young graffiti artist responsible. And that fact has led to fears about the erosion of Hong Kong's distinct freedoms, which are a legacy of its colonial past under the British.

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