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12,500 year old rock art discovered in Amazonian rainforest

Photograph: Marie-Claire Thomas/Wild Blue Media'Sistine Chapel of the ancients' rock art discovered in remote Amazon forest
Tens of thousands of ice age paintings across a cliff face shed light on people and animals from 12,500 years ago

Dalya Alberge, The Guardian (LINK)
Sun 29 Nov 2020 10.00 GMT
Photo: Marie-Claire Thomas/Wild Blue Media

One of the world’s largest collections of prehistoric rock art has been discovered in the Amazonian rainforest.

Hailed as “the Sistine Chapel of the ancients”, archaeologists have found tens of thousands of paintings of animals and humans created up to 12,500 years ago across cliff faces that stretch across nearly eight miles in Colombia.

Their date is based partly on their depictions of now-extinct ice age animals, such as the mastodon, a prehistoric relative of the elephant that hasn’t roamed South America for at least 12,000 years. There are also images of the palaeolama, an extinct camelid, as well as giant sloths and ice age horses.

These animals were all seen and painted by some of the very first humans ever to reach the Amazon. Their pictures give a glimpse into a lost, ancient civilisation. Such is the sheer scale of paintings that they will take generations to study.

The discovery was made last year, but has been kept secret until now as it was filmed for a major Channel 4 series to be screened in December: Jungle Mystery: Lost Kingdoms of the Amazon.

The site is in the Serranía de la Lindosa where, along with the Chiribiquete national park, other rock art had been found. The documentary’s presenter, Ella Al-Shamahi, an archaeologist and explorer, told the Observer: “The new site is so new, they haven’t even given it a name yet.”

New SF Pics to Quarantine With Again

Thanks to: Josiah, Lydia at Mission Local
Spinning vinyl: FZ, Doors, the Dead, XTC, Rush, Talking Heads

fnnch (including a colab with Jeremy Novy)

Yon (just one)

Haight St., SF

In the Western Addition, SF

On Valencia St., SF (just one)

In the Mission, SF (just one)

Oz in the Richmond, SF (just one)

A 1964 protest sign!

In Golden Gate Park (just one)

Getting Tricky with New San Francisco Uploads

Thanks to: Josiah, Laura W., Mission Local
Spinning vinyl: Rush, XTC, Jimi

>NEW< M.iluminSF

Eclair

MR (just one)

On Divisadero

In the Mission District

Clarion Alley (just one)

At the Ferry Building

Upper Market St.

On Valencia St.

Alamo Sq. (just one)

At a protest (just one)

Spooky-Fresh Photo Upload

Thanks to: Brooklyn Street Art, r/stencils, Stencil Art FB group, r/streetart
Spinning vinyl: Ween, Talking Heads, Zappa
Photo: Zombie Pelosi by Xsacto

EUROPE

>NEW< STRA (FR)

>NEW<  LAPIZ (DE)

Banksy (just one)

C215 (just one)

Berlin (just one)

France (just one)

Italy (just one)

USA

Hawaii (just one)

NYC

Oregon (just one)

Wisconsin

Joe Iurato and Logan Hicks (just one)

Keyvan Shovir (CK1) (just one)

Praxis (just one)

stikman (just one)

Xsacto

Historical Graffiti Anti-Evil Spells


Medieval Graffiti to Repel Witches and Evil Spirits Found In Britain
21 OCTOBER, 2020 - 17:52 ED WHELAN
LINK

In Britain, a mysterious discovery has been made in the ruins of a church in an abandoned medieval village. On some stones, archaeologists have found graffiti and some enigmatic marking. It is believed that the markings were made to ward off evil spirits or witches. This discovery is a timely one as we approach Halloween.

Currently, there is a major infrastructure project being carried out in Stoke Mandeville, Buckinghamshire, England. It involves the construction of rail lines and a highway. This project will totally destroy a long-abandoned medieval village. ‘The deserted village site stands among fields half a mile south of today's Stoke Mandeville’, according to the Buckingham Archaeological Society . Archaeologists from Fusion JV are currently working to excavate as much of the village as they can.

Deserted medieval village
The focus of their work is on the ruins of the 12 th-century church of St Mary’s now little more than rubble. This was demolished many centuries ago, however, archaeologists were stunned to find beneath a heap of stones, the walls and floors of the place of worship. Andrew Harris, a manager with Fusion JV stated that ‘The levels of preservation of some of the features of the church are surprising given its age’ reports the HS2 Media Centre .

On the stones, of the demolished church they have found some graffiti. They have also discovered some curious markings. According to The Bucks Herald , ‘Two stones with a central drilled hole from which a series of lines radiate in a circle have been uncovered at the site of St Mary’s’. These engravings were of great interest to the team of archaeologists.

Witches marks or medieval graffiti?
One possibility was that the markings are medieval sundials that were used to tell the time and indicate the time for mass and prayers to the faithful. However, the engravings were found on a stone that was close to the ground. This would seem to indicate that they were not sundials.

Minimal Man Stencils in Early-80s San Francisco

Echoes Are All I See
By marcella faustini, for Art Practical
September 10, 2015

“No one lives but me, shadows are my only friends, and ghosts are all I see.”
                                       —Minimal Man, “Loneliness,” from The Shroud Of, 1981.

Despite the gentrifying pressure of high real-estate prices, the history of San Francisco’s underground culture and some of its notorious characters still haunts the city. Such is the case with Minimal Man, an early ’80s band fronted by Patrick Miller. The band, with a blend of post-punk, noise, and industrial music, produced six albums and numerous singles with a rotating cast of members.  Although its output remains semi-obscure, the band has a cult following among enthusiasts of genre-bending music. Great interest is also derived from Miller’s erratic life, which took him to a handful of cities in the United States and Europe, leaving a trail of stories that are recounted and mythologized as part of the subculture of the cities he inhabited.

The documentation of the band’s existence while in San Francisco is scattered. Between previously published articles, phone calls, and email exchanges with members from different incarnations of the band, a semblance of the band’s trajectory can be pieced together.

Minimal Man’s sound is often grouped with industrial music and bands like Chrome, Suicide, and NON, although Miller claimed to have eschewed style categories when making the music. His musical premise was to rely upon synthesizers rather than guitars for the sound.

The first album, The Shroud Of (1981), sounds as if someone is singing from a far room. The lyrics touch on uneasy subjects such as alienation and despair, and the combination of synths and noise creates an ominous atmosphere. The music’s influences of punk and noise gave way to industrial sounds and hints of electronic body music (EBM, a danceable combination of postindustrial music and synth-punk); this last development came about during Miller’s time in Belgium, where EBM first developed.

The course of the band’s musical development is uneven. There are backward nods to arena rock in Safari (1984) and a disparate choice of more conventional instruments for Hunger is All She Has Ever Known (1988). But Minimal Man reached its highest point when it
merged noise, industrial, punk, and cold wave, creating dark and powerful moments conducive to solitary dancing with shut eyes and clenched fists. Both The Shroud Of and Sex with God (1985) are examples of this successful intersection of musical styles.

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