Artist Interview

Xavi Panneton Interview

http://solpurpose.com/featured-artist-xavi-panneton/

For about 5 years now, I have have been lucky to visit with artist Xavi Panneton and snap photos of his glyphic stencils (check out his archive here). Over the past few months, Xavi has been putting up a mural on Cypress St. (at 24th St.). Utilizing graffiti and stencil techniques, along with other amazing styles, Xavi's mural continues his deep search for universal meanings via color, patterns, and lines. Soulpurpose snapped some great shots of his new work and interviewed him in the process. You should click over to see all the great photos that go with the discussion.

Here's an example Q and A to tease you to click through:

Many of the stencils and glyphs that you create seem to be encoded with a form of language - holding layers of information expressed through geometries.  Do these symbols carry any preset meaning for you?  Are there any symbols that hold a particularly special resonance?

X:   The primary ‘meaning’ of the symbols for me is that they are vast sums of experience condensed into a single package that can be downloaded instantly into your mind and heart. The total contents of the package will then be instantaneously cognized at every level of your being. The symbols are literally a visual mark of the experience contained within it. For example, you get a package that contains the entire history of a particular culture. The ‘symbol’ is the -spiritual identities- of every person who lived in that culture combined, as well as all their knowledge and experiences.  All this is condensed into one shape that burns with meaning and a strange familiarity.

Sometimes I like to make a symbol that looks like a frog or whatever and say “thats the frog symbol”!  “Sun Spirit”  symbol is another one… thats just for fun…

Stencil Archive Talks Mu-Ban with ROBBBB (Beijing)

Last year, Sean Leow took my Street Art tour of San Francisco's Mission District. He knew a good bit about art in the streets and eventually asked me "do you know about any stencils and graffiti in China?" My answer was no. I believed that it existed and was not that well known due to language barriers (as well as accessing evidence of a sometimes illegal art inside a tightly-controlled country like China). Leow not only knew about street art and graffiti from that part of the planet, he also was part of a group of people who were creating content for the site Neocha Edge, based in Shanghai (http://edge.neocha.com/category/street-urban-art/). He gave me links and jpgs of art from China, Taiwan, and other parts of Asia. I eventually posted them up in the Asia Archive (https://www.stencilarchive.org/archives/index.php/Asia), and was happy to have two artists, Brother (https://www.stencilarchive.org/archives/index.php/Asia/artists/Brother-T...) and ROBBBB, get their own artist archives.

Since then, ROBBBB has gotten in touch to say hello from Beijing, pass his personal link along (http://robbbb.com/), and give me some more jpgs to post into his archive (https://www.stencilarchive.org/archives/index.php/Asia/artists/ROBBBB).

I am happy to know that there are stencil artists getting up in China. When I wrote "Stencil Nation," I attempted to include parts of Asia in the content. I was fortunate enough to find a few photographers via Flickr who had traveled to Taiwan and Japan and snapped up some stencil photos. Back in 2008, Asia seemed to be a blank spot in the Stencil Archive geography. There were no books, and artists like Logan Hicks were just starting to travel there with stencil art. I knew it had to be there, and, like the rest of the world, street art and graffiti has blossomed in all cracks and corners of the globe. Including Taibei and Beijing.

(Stencil by ROBBBB, Beijing)

During our most recent email exchange, ROBBBB wished that the English-speaking world could find out more about stencils in China. So I asked him some questions and he was glad to answer them. I have cleaned up the grammar of ROBBBB's answers, but have tried to keep the spirit and intent of his answers intact. I look forward to seeing more mu-ban art and graffiti from China. Keep an eye out for new works by ROBBBB, along with other folks who cut the negative space.

……………………………

Stencil Archive: How do you say "stencil" in your dialect?

ROBBBB: We call stencils "模板". To pronounce it, it is spelled "mu-ban".

Stencil Archive: My research shows that cut out art originated in China. Do you have any historical details about cut out art?

ROBBBB: Do you know the "paper-cut for window decoration"?

Stencil Archive: No.

ROBBBB: "On the joyous New Year's Day, a lot of people in this area stick various kinds of paper-cut - paper-cut for window decoration - in windows so that they can enjoy it. The paper-cut for window decoration not only sets off the joyous festive air; it also brings beautiful enjoyment to people by incorporating decorating, appreciation, and an ease-of-use into an organic whole. The paper-cut is a kind of well popularized folk art, well received by people through the ages. Because it is mostly stuck on the window, people generally call it "the paper-cut for window decoration".

Rojo and Harrington Interview Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey : Too "Street" For Corporate, Too Corporate For The Street (PHOTOS)
Posted: 07/ 4/11 12:20 AM ET

Shepard Fairey has grown up before the eyes of fans, peers and would be competitors. Undaunted by criticism he gets from both sides of his chosen vocation as a globally-known street artist, the man still has a great deal to say. His art has made its way into homes, museums, wardrobes and book collections in addition to all the walls--legal and illegal--and he pays the price and gains the benefit of all of it. A living conundrum, he embodies the sharp tongued anti-establishment, anti-corporate, anti-police state ethos of his formative years, while gradually beginning to resemble the middle-aged dad who so much of the punk generation rebelled against.

He raises money for individuals and organizations advocating for the disempowered or victimized, yet street art and graffiti kids who feel marginalized in their lives call him a sellout for making commercial work. Without the credibility of major shows, arts institutions, and collectors he could never afford to employ people who help him. Yet keeping it clean and doing legal walls costs him "street cred." How exactly does one become an authority on questioning authority? You try this balancing act, and see how far you get without a scrape or two.

A Chat with ECCE

One of the earliest and most regular contributors to StencilArchive's
photo cache just happens to be the farthest away. ECCE (Latin for
behold and pronounced A-che) lives in Australia, where stencil art is
apparantly beginning to really take off. After doing some research
online, and figuring out that we're 17 hours apart, we then coordinated

A Chat with Peat Wollaeger

When Peat Wollaeger sent in his first submission to StencilArchive, I
was instantly impressed with his mastery of creating stencils. His
colors made the images jump off of the page. His cutting style had its
own unique characteristics, and his love for the artform was easily
apparant. When I mentioned having an online chat, he got really excited

WACTAC Broken Crow Interview (Video)

The Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council (WACTAC) has started to do a series of interviews that feature Twin Cities artists in their studios. One of our first interviews is with stencil artist extrodinaire Broken Crow. Thought you be interested in checking it out. (Link to WACTAC)

Interview with Lord Hao

Due to a language barrier (Hao speaks broken English and I don't speak any French), StencilArchive.org wrote out a list of questions that a friend of Hao's interpreted into French. His friend then interpreted Hao's answers into English. I have made the best possible effort to clean up the English, but some things would be best left to Hao's own words. In an ideal situation, I'd get to ask him to clarify his phrasing, but it didn't go down that way.

SA: How long have you made stencils?

LH: I started to paint with stencils in 1985.

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